4 Tallest Mountains in Norway

While traveling the Scandinavian country of Norway, there are going to be plenty of locations you’ll want to visit. Oslo, the capital, and the Bryggen wharf are likely high on that list, but if you’re into more adventurous experiences, you may be thinking of something taller.

The snowy peaks of Norway offer an experience for only the bravest and most prepared travelers. Stretching thousands of feet into the sky, the mountains of Norway are a predominant feature that many aim to climb. There are, after all, 291 peaks that top out over 6,000 feet above sea level.

If the notion of adventure and heights grabs your interest, chances are you’ll be enthralled to scale these four incredible summits, which can be found on the tallest mountains in Norway.

4. Store Styggedalstinden

Photo fo remote, snow-covered mountain peak
Toreroraas/ CC BY-SA 3.0

Elevation: 7,831 feet

The snowy slopes of Store Styggedalstinden saw their first human ascent on August 6, 1883. Many others have made it to the eastern summit of this serene mountain, despite the many challenges present throughout the 7,831-foot ascent to the top.

Store Styggedalstinden can be found within the eastern part of Luster in Sogn og Fjordane county. You’ll find its peaks tucked between the Sentraltind and Jervvasstind mountains. Though the view from both the bottom and top may be stunning, Styggedalstinden’s name, when broken down, roughly translates to “Ugly Valley.”

Regardless, there is no doubting the overt beauty of the mountain's slopes, which offer three different climbing experiences dependent on climber skill and the conditions of the mountain.

3. Store Skagastolstinden

Photo of a jagged snow-covered mountain peak
Credit: Erik Eskedal/ Flickr/ CC BY 2.0

Elevation: 7,890 feet

Getting to the summit of Store Skagastolstinden means climbing up nearly 8,000 feet above sea level. As the third-highest mountain in all of Norway, Skagastolstinden has drawn a lot of attention from curious climbers. The conditions aren’t unsafe for travelers, though the brisk chill in the air can bite and cause discomfort if the adventurers are not properly dressed.

In 1876, William Cecil Slingsby and Emanuel Mohn journeyed up the side of Skagastolstinden. Along the way, they passed a glacier known today as Slingsbybreen, which is a relevant landmark in knowing where to find two additional mountains that climbers pass when trying to tackle Store Skagastolstinden.

To reach the base of Skagastolstinden, you’ll have to park at the nearest hotel and trek to the best starting point once it’s time to start climbing. There are four routes to explore, each with varying degrees of difficulty. Slingsby’s Rute, Andrew’s Renne, Heftye’s Renne, and Nordvestveien await the bravest of travelers.

2. Glittertind

Photo of hikers walking through a snowy mountain field
Credit: Sasha64f/ iStock

Elevation: 8,087 feet

A national park found within Norway’s Lom municipality, Glittertind of the Jotunheimen mountain range is also the second highest snow-covered mountain. At just over 8,000 feet above sea level, it takes quite a bit of work to get to its summit. Travel from the Spiterstulen lodge to get to Glittertind and prepare for a hike that isn’t too difficult, but should also only be tackled by professionals.

During the summer, walking around the summit is made a little more difficult thanks to the melting snows of winter. In the winter months, the path is a little easier as it’s not coated in a layer of water melted off the glacier.

Glittertind may be on the higher side, but its difficulty level is actually a bit easier than some of its shorter counterparts.

1. Galdhopiggen

Photo of a mountain valley
Credit: Enter6/ iStock

Elevation: 8,100 feet

On a list of the tallest mountains in the world, Galdhopiggen would have quite a ways to go to catch up to them. But that doesn’t take away from the awe and wonder that comes from staring up at this 8,100-foot natural formation in Oppland, Norway. Many have climbed the snowy slopes of Galdhopiggen to enjoy the panoramic view.

Located in the Jutunheimen National Park in southern Norway, Galdhopiggen is the tallest peak in Norway, but the Norwegians didn’t always know that. Early Nords knew of Galdhopiggen but weren’t aware of just how tall the mountain’s peak is.

Starting in 1844, several attempts were made to reach the summit. It took six years before a group of three men traveling from Lom were able to reach the top of Galdhopiggen. Before them, geologist and mountaineer Baltazar Mathias Keilha attempted to complete the journey to the summit but didn’t make it.

Like many mountains in Norway, Galdhopiggen is often covered in a layer of pristine white snow. While it adds a beautiful touch to the rocky mountain, it poses a risk for anyone hoping to make the climb to the summit.

The Many Mountains of Norway

Photo of a hiker standing on a cliff enjoying a stunning valley and fjord view
Credit: Olga Danylenko/ Shutterstock.com

Think this is all that Norway has to offer in the way of mountainous peaks? If you’re the type who wants to tackle as many adventures as possible, you can count on the Scandinavian country to deliver. These four are a very small fraction of the snowy peaks that beg to be scaled. The question is — just how high do you want to go?

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